The Essential Artifacts?

“Pure science and practical applications push each other” [1].

With the demise of NASA, our attention is drawn to the everyday commodities and understanding gained in receipt of space entrepreneurship; invisible braces, scratch-resistant lenses, temper foam, portable cordless vacuums, freeze drying, water purification, solar energy, and remotely controlled ovens[2]. As we approach the end of 2012 and the beginning of a New Year, once again, we will begin to see movement in support of global nuclear disarmament. As such, I feel it is necessary to review what nuclear science has brought us, discuss what it has done for society, and begin to chart a future without nuclear arms.

Nuclear science is responsible for the creation and the continuing perfection of a number of technologies. Progress in nuclear power efficiency and safety, reduction in cost and aptness of nuclear medicine in diagnostics and treatment, and the humble smoke detector, is a bounty one can be appreciative of [3].  Nuclear science for the purpose of power synergy or arms is often part of political discourse. Though nuclear power and nuclear weapons are both products of nuclear science and both present a definitive risk for human life, the call for nuclear disarmament does not call for; the disassembly of nuclear power (though many anti-nuke campaigns have called for such an action).

On the 12th of November this year public officials will be convene in Brussels to continue discussions on plans and strategies for a future without nuclear arms.  This event is hosted by Global Zero, endorsed by David Cameron and Barac Obama, and is responsible for the gathering and training student leaders for this event [4]. These student leaders will be responsible for spreading the movement and gaining momentum towards creating a world without nuclear weapons.

The threat of nuclear weapons is an instrument that historically has been worn in the monopolies of power.  Nuclear weapons over other armaments have the superior inborn capacity to instil fear in man, a fear that can be invoked with or without their long term materialisations. The press of nuclear weapons has proved an elementary device to help promote awareness and provide some perspective, though more often it is a source to feed mans fears.

Instilling fear in man coupled with authoritarian rule is historically responsible for the world’s most horrendous violations of Human Rights and mass murder. Milgram’s famous experiment on obedience to authority figures demonstrates the capacity of such tools. The Global movement towards disarmament would help remove this fear and provide people with the confidence of voice.

The future is in balance, It is time to watch this space.

References (Harvard)

[1].  Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (2010) Applied nuclear physics for biomedicine, nuclear security and basic science. URL: http://phys.org/news194720066.html accessed: 20/20/12

[2].  NASA, et al (2012) NASA spin-off technologies. URL: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NASA_spin-off_technologies accessed: 20/10/2012

[3].  Anon, a. (2012) Nuclear Engineering. URL: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_engineering accessed: 25/10/2012

[4].  Global Zero (undated) Brussels (European) Institute 2012. URL: http://www.globalzero.org/institutes/brussels accessed: 20/10/2012

[5].  Anon, b. (2012) Milgram Experiment. URL: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milgram_experiment accessed: 25/10/2012

Bibliography (Havard)

[1].  Public Awareness of Nuclear Science. URL: http://www.nupecc.org/pans/index.html Accessed: 20/10/2012

[2].  World News Inc (2012) European Organisation for Nuclear Research. URL:http://wn.com/european_organization_for_nuclear_research?orderby=relevance&upload_time=today accessed: 20/10/2012

[3].  Adams, R. (2010) Guest Blog at Scientific American – The Influence of Information on an Open, Inquiring Mind. URL: http://atomicinsights.com/2010/05/guest-blog-at-scientific-american-the-influence-of-information-on-an-open-inquiring-mind.html accessed: 20/10/2012

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About Oak Haralds

Oak graduated from Keele University in 2012 with a honors degree in Biomedical Science. She is currently studying at the University of Warwick, undertaking a MSc in Science, Media and Public Policy a sympathetic passion that has spurred her to pursue the perfection of science literary art. As a reader she enjoys the myriad of ethical dialog that surrounds medical law and public policy and has a clear understanding of the wearisome task that is providing a fair government funded health system.
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