Artificial organs – science fiction or reality?

Since the dawn of modern molecular biology and cell biology in the 1950s, many people have been dreaming of a day one can create organs in the laboratory from patients’ cell samples. Every year many patients die in hospitals due to malfunctioning or failing organs caused by various diseases or … Continue reading

Sardines for Fertility, a Red Herring?

Odd search phrase popped up in the Sciencebase logs today. Unfortunately, there isn’t an item in the archives that’s particularly relevant other than a story about a baseline analytical study that looked at arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury content of tinned sardines using spectroscopy. I was intrigued, is there some advocacy … Continue reading

Uncharted, Unfashionable, but Unavoidably Wonderful

The exploration of our solar system is one of humanity′s greatest scientific achievements. The last half century has seen huge steps forward in our understanding of the planets, the sun, and the countless other objects in the solar system. Some would say that planetary science is a mature discipline – involving geoscientists, … Continue reading

Social Learning

Social networking sites, forums, blogs and wikis are increasingly open, readily available and user friendly and as such have become platforms for human interaction that can foster and promote the development of networks and learning communities. The great potential for unplanned interaction and serendipitous discovery through such tools also seems … Continue reading

73 Idea Portals to Think About

Since the 1990s companies and other organizations have created so-called “idea portals” for their customers and employees. These websites are aimed at gleaning new ideas and feedback for new products and services, new features and ways to improve processes. They are to all intents and purposes the online equivalent of … Continue reading

Breaking Down Technology Transfer Barriers

Breaking down the technical and legal barriers are essential if technology transfer from academia to industry is to be done efficiently and effectively, according to researchers in Spain. Antonio Hidalgo, Professor of Technology Strategy at the Technical University of Madrid and José Albors, Professor of Business Administration at the Technical … Continue reading

Lifelong Learning is About Connecting People

Individuals now have the autonomy to make their own learning choices and in recent years there has been an emphasis on the “self made learner”, especially in adult education and ongoing professional development. As such, online communities and other so-called web 2.0 tools have come to the fore as potentially … Continue reading

Dissonant Teaching Changes Environmental Minds

There are many educational and ethical issues regarding the environment and environmentalism that are generally not addressed, especially when it comes to teaching non-science students. Independent environmental services professional and college professor Chyrisse P. Tabone, who is based in Tampa/St. Petersburg, Florida has spent several years attempting to find a way … Continue reading

The Dangers of Cloning – a Popular Myth?

The world of biology was relatively quiet and untainted, whereas other natural sciences such as physics and chemistry had suffered from some bad reputations. Nuclear physics is now associated with the tragedies of Chernobyl and Fukushima and chemistry has been associated with pesticides, dangerous drugs and horrible toxins. But the … Continue reading

Theoretical Highest Temperatures

In science it is well known that the lowest temperature possible is 0K. However is it possible to put the same thinking into finding a theoretical highest temperature? Having researched this I found that there is no conclusive answer, merely several different popular theories on whether we can find this … Continue reading

Mitochondrial Disease, Down on Your Knees!

A new approach to in vitro fertilisation, which aims to combat inherited mitochondrial disease has received UK government backing. With draft regulations currently in production, the procedure utilising DNA from three individuals could be in use by 2015. Maintained exclusively down the maternal lineage, these diseases stem from defects within mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA); … Continue reading

The Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics

A few decades ago, the international community published guidelines for athletes, trying to ban performance enhancing drugs in order to guarantee the safety of sportsmen and -women and ensure fair competitions. The phenomenon of enhancing an individual’s performance in sports is also known as doping. Although these guidelines exist for … Continue reading

The Formation Of Man

The New Year never fails to rein in an eclectic range of resolutions, from the life changing to the downright dumbfounding; nevertheless these feats are attempted in the hope o development. Whether wishful thinking or willpower is permeating 2013’s endeavors, commendable personal development has already been achieved and all before … Continue reading

ACL Reconstructive Surgery – Knee Destructive?

Damage of the anterior cruciate ligament in the knee is one of the most common serious injuries in young athletes and, reflecting individual activity, is habitually treated surgically.  ACL reconstruction, the gold standard, requires the harvesting of a hamstring or patella tendon graft, which is used as scaffold for new … Continue reading