Breaking Down Technology Transfer Barriers

Breaking down the technical and legal barriers are essential if technology transfer from academia to industry is to be done efficiently and effectively, according to researchers in Spain. Antonio Hidalgo, Professor of Technology Strategy at the Technical University of Madrid and José Albors, Professor of Business Administration at the Technical … Continue reading

Lifelong Learning is About Connecting People

Individuals now have the autonomy to make their own learning choices and in recent years there has been an emphasis on the “self made learner”, especially in adult education and ongoing professional development. As such, online communities and other so-called web 2.0 tools have come to the fore as potentially … Continue reading

Dissonant Teaching Changes Environmental Minds

There are many educational and ethical issues regarding the environment and environmentalism that are generally not addressed, especially when it comes to teaching non-science students. Independent environmental services professional and college professor Chyrisse P. Tabone, who is based in Tampa/St. Petersburg, Florida has spent several years attempting to find a way … Continue reading

The Dangers of Cloning – a Popular Myth?

The world of biology was relatively quiet and untainted, whereas other natural sciences such as physics and chemistry had suffered from some bad reputations. Nuclear physics is now associated with the tragedies of Chernobyl and Fukushima and chemistry has been associated with pesticides, dangerous drugs and horrible toxins. But the … Continue reading

Theoretical Highest Temperatures

In science it is well known that the lowest temperature possible is 0K. However is it possible to put the same thinking into finding a theoretical highest temperature? Having researched this I found that there is no conclusive answer, merely several different popular theories on whether we can find this … Continue reading

Mitochondrial Disease, Down on Your Knees!

A new approach to in vitro fertilisation, which aims to combat inherited mitochondrial disease has received UK government backing. With draft regulations currently in production, the procedure utilising DNA from three individuals could be in use by 2015. Maintained exclusively down the maternal lineage, these diseases stem from defects within mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA); … Continue reading

The Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics

A few decades ago, the international community published guidelines for athletes, trying to ban performance enhancing drugs in order to guarantee the safety of sportsmen and -women and ensure fair competitions. The phenomenon of enhancing an individual’s performance in sports is also known as doping. Although these guidelines exist for … Continue reading

The Formation Of Man

The New Year never fails to rein in an eclectic range of resolutions, from the life changing to the downright dumbfounding; nevertheless these feats are attempted in the hope o development. Whether wishful thinking or willpower is permeating 2013’s endeavors, commendable personal development has already been achieved and all before … Continue reading

ACL Reconstructive Surgery – Knee Destructive?

Damage of the anterior cruciate ligament in the knee is one of the most common serious injuries in young athletes and, reflecting individual activity, is habitually treated surgically.  ACL reconstruction, the gold standard, requires the harvesting of a hamstring or patella tendon graft, which is used as scaffold for new … Continue reading

Brain Size May Predict Alzheimer’s Risk Years Before Symptoms Appear

US scientists have found brain scans measuring the thickness of certain regions of the brain may help identify people who have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital, in Boston, and the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, studied MRI scans from 159 cognitively normal older … Continue reading

Sharing on the Global Scale

There are obvious differences in quality of life in terms of food availability, access to fresh water, disease prevalence and medicine across many parts of the world. Until recently, the notion of the Third World had a far greater poignancy than the politically correct term “developing world”. While labelling the poorer … Continue reading

Do You Socialise While Scrobbling?

The Last.fm music website apparently has about 40 million active users around the world. The CBS-owned commercial site (and applications) lets you listen to many different kinds of music and has a music recommendation system called the “Audioscrobbler“. This scrobbling system builds a detailed profile of your musical tastes by … Continue reading

Is Ageing A Disease?

With mice being genetically engineered to live 26% longer than average, age-incidence of a broad spectrum of age-related disease being reduced in the lab and dietary restriction significantly increasing lifespan across species, research seeking treatment for ageing is in action. Telomere modification, free radical level reduction and human growth hormone … Continue reading

Staying Connected Even when You’re Offline

When you switch off your internet-connected computer, whether laptop, desktop or smartphone, any tasks that you initiated also stop, or at least pause in hibernating memory. Resume the machine and the task might continue where it left off, or it might require a restart. It’s all very frustrating, time-consuming and … Continue reading

Why is Teaching Environmental Science So Controversial?

Environmental science is about as politically charged a discipline you might find, stem cells GMOs, vaccines, and nuclear energy notwithstanding. In some circles, particularly certain sectors of academia and the media, environmental discussions are synonymous with controversial debates. So, asks environmental scientist, Chyrisse Tabone of Argosy University in Pittsburgh, USA, … Continue reading

A Milestone to Curing Alzheimer’s

Among the diseases most people are afraid of, Alzheimer’s is on the top of the list. This debilitating disease affects many people at old age and can pose difficult situations for the people concerned and their family. Last month scientist at the University of Rostock/ Germany made a spectacular discovery. … Continue reading

10 Definitions of Junk Science

“Understanding how the term junk science is used will enhance debates surrounding the science of sustainability. For by better understanding what science is, we will be better positioned to use it optimally and accurately as we seek to plot a sustainable path forward.” That’s the conclusion of US social scientist … Continue reading

Casts Away!

New drug may reverse the effects of osteoporosis, but caution is warranted. A new drug, recently featured in a top medical journal, could be that ‘magic bullet’ needed for the three million UK osteoporosis sufferers. Studies have highlighted a number of benefits, including increased bone formation and bone mineral density, … Continue reading

Scientists May Have Discovered a New Natural Force

Researchers at the Fermilab near Chicago, a world famous particle accelerator, have found an unexplainable signal in one of their series of experiments. The Fermilab is a physics laboratory investigating the basic principles of existence, dissecting the forces governing the smallest of particles in the universe, smaller than atoms – … Continue reading