How to Soundproof with Style

Street traffic, noisy neighbors and pets keeping you up at night? If you’ve finally found the perfect flat but are unable to sleep with all the city noise, don’t fret! If you’ve considered soundproofing but can’t go constructing walls, and you don’t want to  sacrifice style for a sound night’s sleep- check out these chic, easy alternatives for reducing noise in your home.

Without embarking on a major construction project, there are a several ways to soundproof your home. The best place to start is to figure out the source of the noise or where the majority of the noise is coming from. Once you pinpoint the source it will be much simpler to choose the right noise reducing method for the area.

Building Barriers

If you find that the majority of the noise is coming from other rooms of the house via shared walls or from outside traffic, building a barrier could be a good solution. However there is no need to start fooling around with expensive drywall. Floor to ceiling bookshelves or a media rack will minimize sounds when placed against the offending shared wall. Not only does this look nice and minimize noise, but it gives you a lot of extra storage. Who doesn’t love more storage?

If you have ample storage already, or don’t have the extra space to fit a bookshelf, there is still hope yet. MIO Acoustic Weave tiles and Träullit Hexagons are very effective sound reducers. The MIO tiles are eco-friendly and can be painted to match any décor. They give the wall a lot of texture and character and are relatively inexpensive.  The other tile alternative, while still green, is slightly more Swedish. Träullit Hexagons are made from woodwool cement board and look more like art than sound-proofing.

For a less permanent, more customizable approach, try wrapping a few big plywood panels with some fiberfill and faux upholstering them with a beautiful, lux fabric to match your interior. These look great, and are easy to move around. It’s a great option for those of you who are renting flats.

Another way to reduce noise in your room is by spraying texture onto your ceiling. It’s easy to apply, just ask your local hardware store about acoustic ceiling spray. Roughening the surface will help absorb sound waves rather than bounce them around the room. The spray texture is easy to apply and the result is sometimes referred to as popcorn ceiling.

Street Sounds

If street sounds keep you awake at night, it is most likely a result of thin windows. If you’re willing to shell out the extra cash to upgrade to triple pane windows it will make a difference in the room noise-wise. Triple pane windows have three layers of glass cushioned by layers of inert gasses that contribute to overall sound-dampening. However, if new windows are not in your future there is another way to sound proof your old ones. Your window treatments can work to reduce noise in the room. Select heavy fabrics instead of sheers or lightweight cotton. Consider lux fabrics like velvet. If noise is a problem opt for these curtains instead of light sheers or window blinds.

Softer Things, Softer Sounds

Soft, heavy materials are great when it comes to absorbing sound. Think about a big empty room, sounds echo much more readily in an empty room than a full one. The more materials and textures you have in the room, the harder it is for sound to travel.  Simple additions to your décor like throws, wraps and throw pillows will make all the difference. For noise that comes from above or below, consider adding high-pile rugs with thick pads to muffle sounds escaping from other rooms.

So don’t sacrifice style or start tearing apart your home with construction just to muffle some unwanted noise. Instead, try these easy style-friendly noise reducing tricks.

This article was written by Erie Construction. Follow Erie Construction on Twitter for more information about home improvement.

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About Amanda Goldberg

Amanda Goldberg is a design enthusiast and blogger from the US. She is the managing editor of the Erie Construction Better Home Blog and frequently writes about great design and beautiful homes. Follow Erie Construction on Twitter @ErieMidWest

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2 Responses to How to Soundproof with Style

  1. Paul says:

    When we are thinking of soundproofing we have to realize that sound is a form of a wave and if we can keep it in, then we can also keep it out. Now we can start planning as a teenage kid who wants to soundproof his rehearsal room or a music producer who wants to design his new recording studio – my point being that it is all about the our budget. So we can run to nearby soundproofing store and pick some elegant slick barrier shield which are rather pricey or we can try to some DIY methods like nailing rugs with some interesting patterns to pegboards and place them elegantly in the room. Soundproofing your house can be very easy, relatively cheap and stylish if we let our fantasies fly.

  2. Sheila says:

    Put doublesided sticky tape around the architrave of your window. Attach cling film or clear plastic. Instant double glazing for sound and cold barrier on single glazed windows. You can also buy packs of special film in DIY stores which is tightened by using a hairdryer