Genetically Modified and Enhanced Foods

In order to feed the growing population that has steadily risen from 5 billion to 7 billion in 20 years, we need to utilize science and technology to make the most of what nature provides.

The USA is the main producer of corn, however over 85% is genetically modified, meaning it has been modified in a lab, enhancing traits such as herbicide resistancy or improved nutritional value.

When crops are destroyed by pests and insects, the financial implications to farmers can be colossal, and the impact on communities of starving people in developing countries.

Using chemicals to stave off the pests has many health hazards and can not only cause water pollution from the run-offs but also cause toxins to enter the environment.

Any method that can protect crops but limit damage to health and the environment could have a place in the production of food.

Genetic modification can help protect the crops from pets without the need for vast amounts of chemical pollutants. Modifications can also protect crops from herbicides so that farmers can spray the field to kill weeds, safe in the knowledge that the sprays do not harm the crop or environment.. This saves the farmer money and labour by not pulling up weeds by hand.

Seedlings can be grown with antifreeze genes, as can fish, to tolerate the cold better and yield a greater load. Similarly, plants that can grow in a harsher environment such as one with drought, in soil with a high salt content or ground water will help communities to feed themselves.

In developing countries where many are malnourished, and survive mainly on rice alone, lacking vital nutrients and minerals, a strain of rice containing these vitamins will help improve the health of the people.

Third world countries may lack facilities to obtain or store medicines and vaccines. Scientists are working to develop edible vaccines in tomatoes and potatoes to solve this problem.

Although many countries produce these types of GM foods, this is currently not allowed in Europe, so scientists involved in research and development have devised many clever techniques to enhance food products and help farmers to produce more yield for the money.

Various methods are used to increase crop yield such as treating seeds with a protective layer to deter pests from destroying the seeds, increasing the percentage of crop harvested.

This method has been successfully used on rice which is the main source of nutrition in countries in Asia and Latin America.

The way rice is grown has been changed using an integrated program. High quality treated seeds are grown under special conditions with a specialized growing media. Growers follow a strict protocol tailored to their needs.

This method is GM free, not only increases the yield by 30% but also is more economical with water and far less labour intensive. Instead of spraying entire fields with pesticides and chemicals that affect the environment.

A diet lacking in Vitamin A has been linked to blindness in thousands of children in developing countries. GM foods such as rice can help combat this. Also enhancing food such as corn and producing orange sweet potato rich in Vitamin A enables the 250 million children at risk of blindness.

For the farmer, these methods help to result in a greater harvest. For the person living in the developing world, these methods help the fight against starvation and malnourishment, but what about the consumer in the developed world? Is this the only way forward to keep the majority of the world fed and nourished?

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In order to feed the growing population that has steadily risen from 5 billion to 7 billion in 20 years, we need to utilize science and technology to make the most of what nature provides.

The USA is the main producer of corn, however over 85% is genetically modified, meaning it has been modified in a lab, enhancing traits such as herbicide resistancy or improved nutritional value.

When crops are destroyed by pests and insects, the financial implications to farmers can be colossal, and the impact on communities of starving people in developing countries.

Using chemicals to stave off the pests has many health hazards and can not only cause water pollution from the run – offs but also cause toxins to enter the environment.

Any method that can protect crops but limit damage to health and the environment could have a place in the production of food.

Genetic modification can help protect the crops from pets without the need for vast amounts of chemical pollutants. Modifications can also protect crops from herbicides so that farmers can spray the field to kill weeds, safe in the knowledge that the sprays do not harm the crop or environment.. This saves the farmer money and labour by not pulling up weeds by hand.

Seedlings can be grown with antifreeze genes, as can fish, to tolerate the cold better and yield a greater load. Similarly, plants that can grow in a harsher environment such as one with drought, in soil with a high salt content or ground water will help communities to feed themselves.

In developing countries where many are malnourished, and survive mainly on rice alone, lacking vital nutrients and minerals, a strain of rice containing these vitamins will help improve the health of the people.

Third world countries may lack facilities to obtain or store medicines and vaccines. Scientists are working to develop edible vaccines in tomatoes and potatoes to solve this problem.

Although many countries produce these types of GM foods, this is currently not allowed in Europe, so scientists involved in research and development have devised many clever techniques to enhance food products and help farmers to produce more yield for the money.

Various methods are used to increase crop yield such as treating seeds with a protective layer to deter pests from destroying the seeds, increasing the percentage of crop harvested.

This method has been successfully used on rice which is the main source of nutrition in countries in Asia and Latin America.

The way rice is grown has been changed using an integrated program. High quality treated seeds are grown under special conditions with a specialized growing media. Growers follow a strict protocol tailored to their needs.

This method is GM free, not only increases the yield by 30% but also is more economical with water and far less labour intensive. Instead of spraying entire fields with pesticides and chemicals that effect the environment.

A diet lacking in Vitamin A has been linked to blindness in thousands of children in developing countries. GM foods such as rice can help combat this. Also enhancing food such as corn and producing orange sweet potato rich in Vitamin A enables the 250 million children at risk of blindness.

For the farmer, these methods help to result in a greater harvest. For the person living in the developing world, these methods help the fight against starvation and malnourishment, but what about the consumer in the developed world? Is this the only way forward to keep the majority of the world fed and nourished?

 

In order to feed the growing population that has steadily risen from 5 billion to 7 billion in 20 years, we need to utilize science and technology to make the most of what nature provides.

The USA is the main producer of corn, however over 85% is genetically modified, meaning it has been modified in a lab, enhancing traits such as herbicide resistancy or improved nutritional value.

When crops are destroyed by pests and insects, the financial implications to farmers can be colossal, and the impact on communities of starving people in developing countries.

Using chemicals to stave off the pests has many health hazards and can not only cause water pollution from the run – offs but also cause toxins to enter the environment.

Any method that can protect crops but limit damage to health and the environment could have a place in the production of food.

Genetic modification can help protect the crops from pets without the need for vast amounts of chemical pollutants. Modifications can also protect crops from herbicides so that farmers can spray the field to kill weeds, safe in the knowledge that the sprays do not harm the crop or environment.. This saves the farmer money and labour by not pulling up weeds by hand.

Seedlings can be grown with antifreeze genes, as can fish, to tolerate the cold better and yield a greater load. Similarly, plants that can grow in a harsher environment such as one with drought, in soil with a high salt content or ground water will help communities to feed themselves.

In developing countries where many are malnourished, and survive mainly on rice alone, lacking vital nutrients and minerals, a strain of rice containing these vitamins will help improve the health of the people.

Third world countries may lack facilities to obtain or store medicines and vaccines. Scientists are working to develop edible vaccines in tomatoes and potatoes to solve this problem.

Although many countries produce these types of GM foods, this is currently not allowed in Europe, so scientists involved in research and development have devised many clever techniques to enhance food products and help farmers to produce more yield for the money.

Various methods are used to increase crop yield such as treating seeds with a protective layer to deter pests from destroying the seeds, increasing the percentage of crop harvested.

This method has been successfully used on rice which is the main source of nutrition in countries in Asia and Latin America.

The way rice is grown has been changed using an integrated program. High quality treated seeds are grown under special conditions with a specialized growing media. Growers follow a strict protocol tailored to their needs.

This method is GM free, not only increases the yield by 30% but also is more economical with water and far less labour intensive. Instead of spraying entire fields with pesticides and chemicals that effect the environment.

A diet lacking in Vitamin A has been linked to blindness in thousands of children in developing countries. GM foods such as rice can help combat this. Also enhancing food such as corn and producing orange sweet potato rich in Vitamin A enables the 250 million children at risk of blindness.

For the farmer, these methods help to result in a greater harvest. For the person living in the developing world, these methods help the fight against starvation and malnourishment, but what about the consumer in the developed world? Is this the only way forward to keep the majority of the world fed and nourished?

Image reproduced from usahitman.com

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About Nadia Tejani

Nadia Tejani lives in Surrey and works as a Personal Trainer specialising in weight management and obesity. She is also a Sports Massage Therapist and fitness model. Nadia runs marathons and does Olympic weightlifting and she has been competing nationally in Natural Figure (Bodybuilding) competitions since 2008. Nadia has a degree in Pharmacology and is qualified in Nutrition. She sticks to a strict clean vegetarian diet and practise what she preaches! Nadia has 3 dogs, a tiny horse and 2 pygmy goats.
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