Finding it Hard to Wake Up in the Morning?

London Life Coach & Relationship Expert Sloan Sheridan-Williams talks about waking up energised in the morning. Follow Sloan on Twitter @SloanSW_London and check out Sloan’s website www.sloansw.com

Thank you for your question regarding the fact that you find it difficult to wake up in the morning. I often hear my clients say they got out of bed the wrong side that morning and they ask how to wake up full of positivity, joy and gratitude ready to embrace the day ahead of them.

There is no one easy answer. Different things will help different types of people, for example if you are an S (Sensory) type personality practising simple morning rituals may help set an elevated mood for the day ahead. By setting out these morning tasks – be it a skincare routine, a leisurely breakfast, morning meditation or yoga – we are telling ourselves that we are important and that we matter. For those N (Intuitive) type people, the concept is still the same but with a little more sponteniety. It is still important to do something spiritually, emotionally or physically important to us before we get carried away with the daily necessities of life and get swept up into our schedule of tasks.

Tony Robbins, a well-known NLP practitioner amongst other things developed the Hour of Power, since then there have been many adaptations to this power hour but the overall end aim is the same. Some divide the hour into three chunks of twenty minutes, be it for meditation, exercise, learning, growth, beauty and health whereas others use it for improving sports performance perhaps running or even rowing. Whatever you decide to do, using this power hour for positive affirmations is an amazing way to start the day. It is my suggestion to spend fifty minutes doing such and the last 10 minutes being grateful for what you have already received the previous day.

However most people reading this are busy professionals and it seems practically impossible to take a whole hour out of your day especially in the morning to give time to yourself. Understanding this, it is a good idea to give yourself five minutes each day and maybe even stretch that to ten or fifteen minutes. Even by adding a few minutes each day you can take extra time for yourself before your heavy workload begins. In five minutes you can do some stretches; in ten minutes you can journal; some people even use their time to make a smoothie in the morning to give them that extra boost of energy and all those antioxidants which are great for the skin.

Whatever you choose to spend time on in your first hour, even if you have to use it commuting, remember this hour sets the tone for the next 23 hours before us and what we do daily can become part of who we are. Perhaps on your commute reading inspirational material will help create positivity in your life. Those who live closer to work could perhaps leave ten minutes early and walk to work instead of taking the bus or another mode of transport.

The morning is a wonderful time to write lists, especially if you are goal-orientated in personality type. It allows your Reticular Activating System to remember that the day is full of potential and will start seeking out ways for you to achieve not only that which you desire but also deserve. There is no one set rule to creating the perfect morning for you but when you next get ten minutes to yourself perhaps look at these questions:

1. What would I need to do to get my day off to the best possible start?

2. What would my body need me to do to enable it to not only look its best but feel its best?

3. What do I need to do to increase my positivity in the morning?

4. What do I find exciting and/or inspiring to do on a daily basis that only takes 5/10/15/20 minutes (or whatever time you have been able to make available for yourself)?

If whatever you have been doing in the past has not been working for you then the best thing to do is break the pattern – be your own pattern interrupt and do something totally different with your physiology. For example, if you normally exercise in the morning perhaps look at cutting down and including fruit smoothies or a nice herbal green tea or even journaling in the morning.

Alternatively, if you have quite a sedate morning full of positive affirmations and gratitude perhaps intersperse this with exercise or taking up a new hobby – be that yoga or meditation indoors or perhaps something outdoors during the summer months like running and or even power walking with a friend.

A good morning can only be as good as the night before, therefore make sure that you get a good night’s sleep and do not drink too much alcohol for your body – and if you do break either of these that you some sort of remedy in the morning be it a natural supplement like milk thistle to detoxify your liver or a pick-me-up in the form of a nice strong coffee if that’s what you desire after a late night.

Whatever you choose to do to feel more energised to embrace the day ahead, remember to take it slowly, step by step, and little by little and these changes will eventually become part of your daily routine and help you feel better about yourself.

Images reproduced from nextnature.net and truthworks.org

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About Sloan Sheridan-Williams

Sloan Sheridan-Williams is currently known for her work as one of the leading “diagnostitians in the complementary therapy world” with a wealth of experience from over a decade of practice. Sloan was originally known in her capacity as an experienced therapist and success coach, but she is impossible to pigeon hole. Over the last 15 years, she has had the opportunity to work in many different arenas from legal to political, medical to media, and corporate to academia. Educated at Oxford University where she originally read Medicine, Sloan then attended University College London before converting to Law studying at the College of Law. Sloan continued her education at Hertfordshire University and then at King’s College London, to name but a few. Sloan has enough experience of someone twice her age. Sloan has collaborated with some of the finest institutions in the country, if not the world and has had the pleasure to work with some very talented individuals taking them to even greater heights. She now writes as Sloan on numerous projects, while still finding the time to continue as a therapist and coach. On a slight tangent to her medical background, her side interest is Medical Ethics, in which she acquired a Masters of Law. In her spare time, when she is not fundraising for numerous charities or coaching rowing, Sloan is often seen debating with the best on topical issues. Visit www.sloansw.com and follow Sloan on Twitter @SloanSW_London
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