Depression – What to Do?

1 in 4 British adults experience at least one diagnosable mental health challenge in any one year, according to mentalhealth.org. Furthermore, major depressive disorder affects approximately 14.8 million adults in a given year in America, according to the NIMH.

What are the symptoms?

Depression will often manifest as a lack of motivation. When you don’t want to get out of bed in the morning or you start to hate your life, for whatever reason, then you have been feeling increasing symptoms for a while. You may feel hopelessness, anxiety or helplessness. Your may be less tolerant of others. It is possible that you have considered suicide. You will have less energy and could be experiencing changes in your sleep pattern, appetite or even your menstrual cycle.

Depression affects friends and family members.

All in all, depression affects a vast number of the population and this has ramifications on not just the person who is depressed, but on everyone who cares about them. It is likely that most of the population knows someone who is depressed, whether they have been diagnosed or not.

This page has been created to help those who have depression and those who know someone who is depressed. How can you help them? What do you say? What advice can you give to someone who asks for your help or advice?

What can you do?

Our wellbeing e-course will offer you simple, but very powerful, ways to move in a more positive direction. Getting active is also a great way to start moving to a more positive place. Our Walk Innovation System is a good place to start. By leaving your name and e-mail with us in the box on the right of this screen, you will access the numerous free resources available to you. If you are ready for a big shift then you may be ready for a Wellbeing Breakthrough Session.

What will happen if I don’t do anything about it?

You will suffer, your friends and family, who care about you, will suffer and you may soon feel suicidal. It could cost you your job, your relationships and your life. The true cost of long-term depression cannot truly be measured. The ripple effect caused by negative interactions has the potential to affect thousands of people, maybe more. Ultimately, those who go on to commit suicide do so because they did not get help when they started to feel depressed.

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About Adam Shaw

Adam Shaw grew up within the grounds of a Psychiatric Hospital, where his parents worked and lived. Since commencing his own career as a health professional in 1992, he has qualified in several fields of health, including nursing, Reiki, NLP, Hypnosis and Vortex Healing. During his career he has worked with thousands of people with health challenges, journeying into the deeper-rooted realms of wellness. He has now created The Secrets of a Cardiac Nurse - The Prescription Doctors Don't Give, a step-by-step guide to better health and wellbeing and now shares his learnings through writing, speaking and events. He provides on-line resources via his website adamshaw.co. Follow Adam on Twitter @adam_shaw
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One Response to Depression – What to Do?

  1. smi says:

    My mum always says, if you feel down in the dumps then ”go and help someone” – offer to do your neighbours shopping, help with gardening, clean windows, take someone for a walk in the park, then see how you feel 🙂 In short ”by being love to others you will be helping yourself too”.