About Verity Danbold

Verity Danbold has written extensively for stage and page. After completing her BA Honours (English and Drama) and MA (Theatre and Development) at the University of East Anglia, Verity went on to write for a number of international NGOs, including the UN Maternal Health Project in Cambodia, dance4life Vietnam and Empowerment International in Nicaragua. Her creative writing credits include Scenes from an Everyday Affair and Soliloquies for My Lost Sisters, nominated for Best Emerging Writer and Green Room Awards in the 2011 Melbourne Fringe Festival. She is currently working on the film of Soliloquies and two new works.

The Hub – Changing Lives, Changing Futures

Bangkok sees a steady stream of travelers drawn in by its legendary hedonistic pleasures, ancient temples and chockablock markets. There are, of course, daily glimpses into Bangkok’s less-glamorous side; the beggar asleep in the doorway, the used needle in the kerb, the child begging. For too many, this is merely … Continue reading

Bell Makers and Giant Mushrooms: Exploring the Unexpected

There’s something intrinsically satisfying about riding the train to the end of the line. Some thirteen hours out of Bangkok, Ubon Ratchathani  province is nearly at the Thai-Laos boarder. The city of same name to a working town with none of the picturesque colonial stylings, enduring cultural practices, sunny beaches … Continue reading

ATD Fourth World: Empowerment, Change & Community

ATD Fourth World operates in twenty-five countries worldwide, championing the cause of the most vulnerable and impoverished with dedication, compassion and a human rights based approach. From its 100,000 members worldwide to its permanent delegation to the European Union, ATD Fourth World addresses the challenge of poverty on every level. … Continue reading

Thailand: An Ongoing Adventure

You meet them in droves when traveling, people who’ve ‘done’ Fiji, the Amazon and China. Three weeks on a tourist bus and they have miraculously acquired supreme knowledge of the food (delicious but avoid the water), the people (so friendly!) and sites (amazing, but not nearly as good as Angkor … Continue reading

The Australian Outback Experience

Stark red earth, the dry gray-green of stunted plants, kangaroos and unending flat, disorienting planes; I doubt I am alone in these images of the Outback, culled from postcards, films and friends’ Facebook albums. But after a year of record rains, this is a land transformed. Blanked in thorny shrubs, … Continue reading

Bagan: Burma’s Ancient City in Modern Myanmar

Thirteen centuries ago, the ancient kingdom of Pagan was the first to unify what we now know as Burma/Myanmar. At the kingdom’s height, the capital of Pagan was prosperous, deeply religious and a nexus of trade and learning. From 1044-1287, the wealthy citizens and their rulers built over 10,000 religious … Continue reading

Holiday in Haridwar

Located 32 km from the more famous Rishikesh, Haridwar is often merely a side trip on many Western traveller’s agendas. Bustling with temples, markets and rich historical past, it is a town more than worthy of its own distinction. For many, Haridwar’s primary attraction is its profoundly religious significance. Known … Continue reading

Common River: Connecting Communities

Deep in the Ethiopian Rift Valley, inside a bamboo hut, the air is cool and sweet. Fresh beans snap and whistle in the heat of the fire, sending out rich plumes of coffee-scented smoke. The process is peaceful, methodical. The mortar grinds the beans and water boils. Soon, from the … Continue reading

Talad Rot Fai: Bangkok’s Hippest Market

For the hip young things, Bangkok’s Chatacak market is old news. Overpriced, crawling with sweaty tourists and baby bunnies in tutus, swelteringly hot, row on row of the same stuff all held in a purpose built market. And, let’s be honest, a purpose built market? Who does that these days? … Continue reading

One Love – Community, Circus, Change

“Community-led development” has become a bit of a buzzword in the NGO world, the Holy Grail, it would seem. More laudable, however, is “community-initiated,” especially when the people leading the change are children. In 1998, a group of children in the Ethiopian city of Awassa began to practice circus. They … Continue reading

Dhampur – Dinner is Served!

If you’ve heard of Dhampur, India at all, you’re probably thinking either ‘sugar mill’ or ‘don’t go out at night.” Chances are, you haven’t heard of Dhampur. Six long hours from Delhi, Dhampur hosts a bustlingly market, a sugar mill, some schools, lots of fields of sugar cane, and little … Continue reading

Burmese New Year: Happy Thingyan 2556!

Thingyan in Myanmar/Burma

The New Year is often seen as a time for new beginnings, gathering of friends, merriment and good tidings. In England, of course, it’s a night to shiver in sparkly dresses and watch the sky come to life with fireworks. Life grounds to a standstill as revellers take to the … Continue reading