About Sebastian Müller

Sebastian Müller was born and raised in Leipzig/Germany and moved to England as an adolescent. He is a trained research chemist and geneticist and is currently working as a postdoctoral researcher at the Institut Curie in Paris/ France working in cancer research. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge and is still actively involved at the university today. He is fluent in English, German and French and has many fortés and interests including science, philosophy, linguistics, history, competitive sports such as rowing, fitness and nutrition. He is a freelance writer also drawing from his experience as an author in peer-reviewed scientific journals. "I love writing and putting my thoughts down on paper. The written word to me is one of the most powerful ways of conveying thoughts and initiating discussions."

Browns Cambridge – Dining with Tradition


This week City Connect is reporting on one of the finest and most famous of all Cambridge restaurants: Browns Restaurant. Browns is situated on leafy Trumpington street in central Cambridge and thus easily reachable by anyone from in and outside of Cambridge. Some of our writers went for an evening … Continue reading

Scientists May Have Discovered a New Natural Force

Higgs Masse / Fermilab

Researchers at the Fermilab near Chicago, a world famous particle accelerator, have found an unexplainable signal in one of their series of experiments. The Fermilab is a physics laboratory investigating the basic principles of existence, dissecting the forces governing the smallest of particles in the universe, smaller than atoms – … Continue reading

A Doctor’s Touch


This week, Dr. Sebastian Müller (Ph.D.) discusses the challenging ideas of Dr. Abraham Vergese, a professor at the University of Stanford. Doctors constitute one of the oldest human profession. Arisen mainly from ancient Greek philosophy as well as religious institutions such as monasteries  in the Western world, this profession has … Continue reading

Drug Effectiveness Diminished in Space


Astronauts on long space missions may not be able to take antibiotics to treat infections or aspirin to treat headaches, simply because drugs have been found to decay much faster in space than on earth. A recent study in the AAPS Journal found, that the half-life of drugs is much … Continue reading