About Julia Wood

Julia Wood, (M.A., University of Warwick) is an author, Oscar Wilde scholar and personality. She has received extensive press and television coverage for her distinctive Edwardian lifestyle and designs all her own clothes. Julia is currently working on a novel - a ghost story - set in the Edwardian era. Visit www.julia-wood.com. Follow Julia on Twitter @edwardianspice

Is There an Afterlife?

afterlife bereavement

“That undiscovered country, from whose bourne no traveller returns, puzzles the will…” (Hamlet, William Shakespeare) Is there an afterlife? Where do we go when we die, or do we just vanish back into the nothingness from whence we purportedly came? Philosophers for centuries have been exploring these questions, and religions … Continue reading

Margaret Thatcher: There’s No Such Thing as Society


Whether one loved or hated her, Margaret Thatcher has undoubtedly left her stamp upon British politics and her death last week has confirmed her place in history as one of the most memorable and controversial political icons. Born in Grantham, Lincolnshire on October 13th 1925, Margaret Hilda Roberts, as she … Continue reading

Workhouse or Workfare? Attitudes Haven’t Changed – Part 2


Julia Wood, author and scholar, continues her discussion of “the undeserving poor”, workhouses and today’s attitudes to the unemployed. Throughout the nineteenth century, workhouses became places of refuge for those who were vulnerable, either because they were ill – mentally or physically – or because they were disabled. These people … Continue reading

Workhouse or Workfare? Attitudes Haven’t Changed – Part 1


Few people would dispute that social conditions and standards of living for the poor have improved since Victorian times. Yet, the Government’s draconian measures against benefit claimants suggest that conditions may have improved but attitudes have not really changed. The poor, especially those unable – some would argue unwilling – … Continue reading

A Victorian Christmas – Part 1

Christmas Card, designed by J.C. Horsley for Sir Henry Cole, 1843

How did the Victorians celebrate Christmas? Julia Wood – City Connect’s Features Writer on Art & Culture – looks at the Victorian Christmas and finds out the truth behind the nostalgia and tradition… Christmas is a time when not merely individuals, but culture itself, turns reflective and introspective. It is a sentimental … Continue reading

Sporting in the Olympic Theatre


Olympic fever appears to have taken over the country, with Britain hosting, and performing astoundingly well, particularly in the cycling events, perhaps even putting cycling on the map as a national sport. In such economically dark times, a bit of flag-waving patriotism may be just the tonic the country needs; … Continue reading

Ghost Stories – Part 2

"Nicole Kidman", "The Others", "Ghosts"

In Part One, I looked at the history of the ghost story, utilising Freud’s essay The Uncanny to argue that ghosts are representations of collective fears and prejudices. I argued that, in the Victorian era – when there were stronger boundaries and taboos – ghosts were represented in fiction as … Continue reading